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spoliamag:

Bees are the smallest of birds. They are born from the bodies of oxen, or from the decaying flesh of slaughtered calves; worms form in the flesh and then turn into bees. Bees live in community, choose the most noble among them as king, have wars, and make honey. Their laws are based on custom, but the king (queen) does not enforce the law; rather the lawbreakers punish themselves by stinging themselves to death. Bees are afraid of (affected by) smoke and are excited by noise. Each has its own duty: guarding the food supply, watching for rain, collecting dew to make honey, and making wax from flowers.”

From a medieval (several medieval & ancient) bestiaries.

Man, I love medieval bestiaries, and anything about bees, really.  They’re hilarious and fascinating.  For educational purposes, I crossed out the parts that are not true, bolded the ones that definitely are, and left alone those parts that are sort of true or open to interpretation.

(via shannibal-cannibal)

naturepunk:

continent-of-wild-endeavor:

naturepunk:

In other news, here are some of the projects I got to work on today. I’ve got 6 beautiful rabbit pelts from the butcher’s shop of a unique coloration I’ve never quite seen before. The butcher was concerned that I wouldn’t want them because they’re so different from what he usually gives me. He described them on the phone as simply, “gray” but they’re actually more akin to lavender in hue; it’s hard to capture with the camera, but trust me - they’re amazing! 

There is a color of domestic rabbits called lilac that’s what I thought of when you said lavender.  It’s a dilute chocolate, often described as a lavender/pinkish grey.  Looks like this, but is, as you found, hard to photograph accurately:

I definitely see chocolate coloring in that middle one - so plush, too!  Great skins.  They could also be an interesting blue: 

But they really do look brown; maybe it’s the light.  Chocolate can look like this:

Or this:

 

Awesome! This is really helpful; thank you! :D

You’re welcome!

dottygale:

Vendelin vom Vindstadir
icelandic horse!

dottygale:

Vendelin vom Vindstadir

icelandic horse!

(via fivegaited)

naturepunk:

In other news, here are some of the projects I got to work on today. I’ve got 6 beautiful rabbit pelts from the butcher’s shop of a unique coloration I’ve never quite seen before. The butcher was concerned that I wouldn’t want them because they’re so different from what he usually gives me. He described them on the phone as simply, “gray” but they’re actually more akin to lavender in hue; it’s hard to capture with the camera, but trust me - they’re amazing! 

There is a color of domestic rabbits called lilac that’s what I thought of when you said lavender.  It’s a dilute chocolate, often described as a lavender/pinkish grey.  Looks like this, but is, as you found, hard to photograph accurately:

I definitely see chocolate coloring in that middle one - so plush, too!  Great skins.  They could also be an interesting blue: 

But they really do look brown; maybe it’s the light.  Chocolate can look like this:

Or this:

 

palehorseblackdog:

Jesus Christ

discardingimages:

happy unicorn and a naked virgin

Rothschild Canticles, Flanders 14th century.

Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, MS 404, fol. 51r

I can’t believe this HBO GO account I’ve been mooching from an ex has had the same password for over three years.

Overall assessment: Timeline does a pretty dang good job with the arms.  They’re all plausibly constructed, and may be based on actual arms from the period.  All mounted fighters have them, and foot soldiers may carry the arms of such a superior, in groups.  Some sets of arms are carried by multiple mounted fighters, presumably several men under the immediate command/control of one who owns the arms.  I’m avoiding using terms like “knight” or “lord” or other titles here because they aren’t made clean in the film and I don’t know quite what would be historically appropriate.

The Englishmen’s arms tend towards reds and golds, sometimes eagles, while the Frenchmen’s frequently have blue, silver, and fleurs de lys.  Look at their arms today and you’ll see the same flavor.  This seems reasonably historically accurate, though I’m no expert, but more importantly it makes it easy to know who’s who.  In the middle of a dimly lit battle, you can pretty well tell who’s hitting and who’s getting hit even if you haven’t seen that particular shield before.

Conclusion: Someone did their research.  I’d like to know just how much: did they look up actual people who were at these battles and use their arms?  Or just learn what would have been likely?  A+ use of medieval heraldry, though without obvious internal logic (hierarchy, reference to actual kings at the time).  Lots of interesting designs to look at and figure out.  Good practice for me discovering how to describe them.  Workable, bold designs without small, silly details or fantastical animals.

"Or, a fleur de lys sable" may be "between two pellets".  Or maybe it’s his cousin.

Ermine, a fess or.  Without the canton.  Possibly the “canton” I saw was just the square gap the French have in that corner of their shields.

Gerard Butler is saving the fantastically red-haired (and fairly badass) lady, while her brother, Lord Arnault, fights the English lord.  His shield is bloody, but the arms are clearly recognizable.

There’s something argent, with three cinquefoils azure under 2 bars of the second.  Like, one bar is like a thin chief, and the other a fess (fesslet? or bar, I guess), with 2 flowers between them and one below.  I don’t think it’s barry of four pieces, nor is it tierced per fess (then with a further “per fess”…) because the argent is much wider than the blue in both cases.  French.

I don’t really want to figure it out right now; I’d rather have another bourbon.  I’d love to see your comments, except of course you can’t see it.  Hmm…ok, check out the Chicago flag:

Which is pretty damn sweet, as flags go.  I’ll tell you all about it if you like.  So ignore the white/argent at the top, and imagine the upper blue bit is aligned with the top of the shield.  Then instead of four red stars, there’s 2 blue cinquefoil flowers, then the lower blue bar.  And the bottom edge of it hits about where the escutcheon starts to curve in: 

And the rest below that is white/argent, with one more flower in there.  So a lot more white than blue.